Marketplace

Mondays-Fridays, 6:30-7 p.m. on KUAR
  • Hosted by Kai Ryssdal

In-depth reporting that's transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

(Markets Edition) The Dow and S&P experienced record highs Friday, which might come as a surprise given the nature of the trade relations between the United States and China. We talk to economist Diane Swonk to make more sense of it. Then, we have a lot more with former senator Chris Dodd and former congressman Barney Frank, the duo who pushed through the huge financial reform law that bears their name.

(U.S. Edition) Jack Ma, the founder of online retail powerhouse Alibaba, once promised President Trump that his company would bring a million jobs to the U.S. by 2022. That promise is now being dialed back as the trade feud between the U.S. and China has escalated. Also, we have more with former senator Chris Dodd and former congressman Barney Frank, the duo who pushed through the huge financial reform law that bears their name.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … One of China’s biggest technology startups – dubbed the country’s Amazon for services – jumped more than 7 percent in its trading debut on the Hong Kong stock exchange after raising more than $4 billion dollars in its initial public offering. Then, global growth is forecast to plateau at just under 4 percent this year and next. We’ll talk to the OECD’s chief economist in Paris who says the biggest concern is trade.

Bonus: the Dodd-Frank interview, part 1

6 hours ago

We'll be back with your regularly scheduled Morning Report soon, but right now we're bringing you part one of our interview with Barney Frank and Chris Dodd, the former lawmakers behind one of the country’s largest financial reform bills. In a rare joint interview we're calling "The Politics of Crisis," they talk about their biggest regrets, why there won’t be any more bailouts and why they’re not worried about major rollbacks to Dodd-Frank.

Check back here for part two tomorrow. 

(09/20/18)

If the terms of your student loan agreement suddenly look different, if your bank opens a fake account in your name, or if your credit report is inaccurate, there’s a place that was specifically made for you to complain about that.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, now also known as the Bureau of Consumer Financial Protection, has a submission portal that allows you to report an issue you’re having with a financial service or product.

We’re continuing our look at how technology is impacting Wall Street this week. Today, we explore how the tech industry is starting to question the whole idea of Wall Street.

The tech industry isn't always a big fan of the whole becoming-a-public-company process. Companies like Google, Facebook and most recently Spotify have tried disrupting initial public offerings with different share classes and direct listings. Then there's just deciding not to go public.

A few decades ago, a company had to go public in order to attract enough investment to grow significantly. But times have changed. According to The Wall Street Journal, last year $2.4 trillion in private money was raised in the United States compared to $2.1 trillion in public markets. What’s that mean for ordinary investors? Molly Wood puts that question to Nizar Tarhuni, head analyst at research firm PitchBook, and Howard Marks, CEO of StartEngine, a company that allows everyday investors to put money into private companies. (09/20/18)

When an economy needs refugees

17 hours ago

The White House said this week it will cut the number of refugees allowed into the country to 30,000 next year from the 45,000-person limit for 2018. That's a record low for the United States, which worries many local economies that depend on immigrant and refugee labor. Erie, Pennsylvania, is one of those places. The city strategically welcomed and resettled refugees when the population was shrinking and jobs were disappearing.

There was some big news this week in the auto and tech industries, which are increasingly overlapping. The world's largest automotive partnership, the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance, which sold more than 10 million cars around the world last year, is going to start embedding Google's Android operating system in its cars starting in 2021.  The promise for consumers?  Infotainment systems that do more and are less, shall we say, buggy. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The bill that gives a nod to federal aviation spending over the next five years passed the U.S. House but has yet to take flight in the Senate. The Federal Aviation Administration reauthorization bill includes changes to airline ticket fees, and safety upgrades. But critics say the bill falls short in one area: improving the nation's air traffic control system, which they say is under strain as the industry expands to accommodate more and more passengers. Commercial air carriers have been pushing to move the nation's air traffic control system from radar to GPS.

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