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Like many of the estimated 350,000 undocumented migrants living in Greece, Mohammad Afzaal is trapped in a devastated economy.

He slipped into Greece 11 years ago, when he was 24, and found good work in Athens as a house painter. He wired a chunk of his earnings to his family in the northeastern Pakistani city of Gujrat.

"Each month, I sent 200 or 300 euros back home to my wife, parents and brothers and sisters," says Afzaal, a slight man with a trim black beard. That's around $270 to $400. "I supported seven people."

As Apple Flounders, Samsung Gains Strength

Jan 26, 2013

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

  • Anne Akiko Meyers — the violinist who made news a year ago for an album recorded on her two Stradivarius instruments, including the then record price-breaking "Molitor" Strad, which she purchased for $3.6 million — announced yesterday that she's been given lifetime use of the 1741 "Vieuxtemps" Guarne

Jan. 22, 2013, marks the 40th anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion nationwide.

But the conventional wisdom that the court's 7-2 decision marked the beginning of a contentious battle that still rages today is not the case, according to those on both sides of the dispute.

Except perhaps for dedicated Russophiles, composer Vissarion Shebalin will most likely be a welcome new discovery. He was a student of Nikolay Myaskovsky, highly respected by Prokofiev and a close friend of Shostakovich.

Looking For Lost Memories In The Delta

Jan 5, 2013

Photographer Eugene Richards had several reasons to visit the Arkansas Delta 40 years after his initial visit.

"I went back, ostensibly, to look at the culture and see if there was anything left of it," he says. Or at least — that was the pitch he gave National Geographic magazine, in hopes that it would send him there, which it did. You can see the story in the magazine's November issue.

It's been almost a decade since Johnny Cash died, but fans still travel from around the world to see the place the music legend often described as key to his development: his boyhood home in the eastern Arkansas town of Dyess. The small house will soon serve as a museum — not only as a tribute to Johnny Cash, but also to tell the history of the town.

(On Wednesday, we weaved new information into the top of this post and in updates below. Thursday, we began a new post about the weather.)

NPR has always been committed to authentic coverage of the remarkably different people and issues that make up our world. Now, you can expect to hear much more from us.

Today at the UNITY Convention in Las Vegas, NPR announced that we will receive a $1.5 million grant from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to expand our coverage of race, ethnicity and culture.

A man-made bat cave in Tennessee is looking for tenants. An hour northwest of Nashville, the artificial cave is built to give thousands of bats a haven from a devastating infection called white-nose syndrome.

Millions of bats in the Northeast have died from the infection since it first showed up a few years ago. The culprit is an invasive fungus that grows in caves. When bats hibernate inside, they wake up with faces covered in white fuzz and often wind up starving or freezing to death.

Earlier this year, we reported on the story of Jestina Clayton:

Looking Back At Early Arkansas Mug Shots

May 23, 2012

Across the South and other regions of the U.S., a new form of tabloid has emerged. Rather than celebrities, these magazines show mug shots of the recently arrested — in different cities around the country. And they seem to be selling like hotcakes. In Arkansas, for example, The Slammer sells 7,000 copies a week. But law enforcement says it doesn't help solve cases — it's just voyeuristic.

Making The Perfect Exit

Mar 20, 2009

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MADELEINE BRAND, host:

We called up two more people to talk a little bit about endings. First, Curtis Sittenfeld. She wrote the novel "American Wife." And get this. Our show, Day to Day, pops up on page 490.

(Soundbite of interview)

Bat-Killing Disease Spreads to More States

Mar 16, 2009

A mysterious ailment that is decimating bat colonies in the Northeast has spread more quickly than scientists once believed. "White-nose syndrome," first discovered in 2007, has been confirmed for the first time in New Hampshire and West Virginia. And scientists are investigating suspected sites in Virginia.

Susi von Oettingen, a biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, says the disease was confirmed last month in West Virginia, home to some of country's rarest and most diverse bat populations.

German Left Courts the Working Class

Apr 23, 2008

A new political party in Germany has made saving the working class and the country's welfare system rallying points for attracting votes. It has been drawing support from the mainstream parties with a radical message.

The party, Die Linke, or the Left Party, is a merger of the reformed Communist Party from East Germany and discontented former Social Democrats. One of its co-leaders, Oskar Lafontaine, says that Germany shouldn't turn its back on working people just as they are increasingly struggling to make ends meet.

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