Arkansas Healthcare

Arkansas Governor Mike Beebe has vetoed HB 1037, also known as the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, which would have banned most abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.

"House Bill 1037, if it became law, would squarely contradict Supreme Court precedent," the Governor said in a written statement Tuesday.

A bill that would ban most abortions after 20 weeks may still have a chance, even after the Governor vetoed it Tuesday.

Governor Mike Beebe may have vetoed Representative Andy Mayberry’s 20-week abortion ban, but not before singing the Hensley Republican’s praises for asking Lieutenant Governor Mark Darr not to sign it while the Governor was out of the state.

Governor Mike Beebe is heading back from Washington DC, and with him are answers to lawmakers’ questions about the state’s options for expanding Medicaid under the Federal health care law.

The Governor, a Democrat, supports expansion, but some Republicans want more flexibility in the plan.

Representative Charlie Collins of Fayetteville says he and his colleagues want to see more private insurance options.

Arkansas Receives $42 Million Health Care Grant

Feb 22, 2013

Governor Mike Beebe met with Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in Washington DC this Friday to discuss how low-income Arkansans can purchase insurance without going on expanded Medicaid. 

Arkansas is one of six states to be awarded a $42 million dollar grant for a new health care initiative. Beebe says the plan will address preventative care, as well as existing chronic conditions. 

Governor Mike Beebe met with Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in Washington DC this Friday to discuss how low-income Arkansans can purchase insurance without going on expanded Medicaid. 

Arkansas is one of six states to be awarded a $42 million dollar grant for a new health care initiative. Beebe says the plan will address preventative care, as well as existing chronic conditions. 

The Arkansas House of Representatives is set to vote on two controversial abortion bans, possibly later this week, after a committee approved the legislation Tuesday.

  The Arkansas House of Representatives is set to vote on two controversial abortion bans, possibly later this week, after a committee approved the legislation Tuesday.

One bill would ban abortions after 20 weeks, and the other would ban them after 12. Both bills have been amended to include exceptions for rape, incest and the health of the mother, but some say both bills go too far, infringing on women’s rights to control their reproductive health.

New Arkansas Program Tries To Improve Emotional Health

Feb 15, 2013

While some Arkansans are taking the necessary precautions to protect their physical health through diet and exercise, many people still aren’t managing their emotional wellbeing.

Wally Goddard is a professor of Family Life for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture. After reviewing research, Goddard started a new curriculum that helps people build better relationships and it’s being distributed statewide through the Cooperative Extension Service.

File photo. State. Senator Jason Rapert (R-Bigelow) with former State Representative Anne Clemmer testifying to a committee in 2013.
Nathan Vandiver / KUAR

After tabling the issue, a House committee is advancing a bill that would ban most abortions in Arkansas after 12 weeks.

Senator Jason Rapert’s bill seeks to prohibit abortions once a fetal heartbeat has been detected.

It passed the Senate but was tabled in a House committee until a lunchtime hearing Thursday, when it was brought back up with two amendments.

Arkansas Children's Hospital says its president and chief executive officer Jonathan Bates will retire next summer.

The hospital’s foundation, board of directors and Research Institute announced that with his stepping down, it will establish a $ 3 million endowed chair to initially fund the Jonathan R. Bates Center for Patient and Professional Advocacy.

The center will focus on improving the delivery of health care, while lowering its cost.

Doctors voicing their opposition to Issue 5
Photo: Kezia Nanda

Several doctors are voicing their opposition to a medical marijuana proposal that will be on the ballot next month.

Members with the Physician Coalition Against Medical Marijuana spoke Wednesday afternoon in Little Rock saying marijuana has not been adequately researched.

Dr. David Smith with Baptist Health Medical Center says he deals with patients suffering from pain and death everyday and doesn’t believe this is the solution.

Arkansas Medicaid Funding And Youth Home: Part Two

May 28, 2012
Kesia Clemons
Malcolm Glover

A $39.4 million increase in Arkansas’s revenue forecast for the last two months of the fiscal year means the state can fund second-tier annual budget priorities and provide some money for Medicaid.

However, analysts note the positive trend in revenue collections will do little to close a looming $400 million Medicaid shortfall in two years, a deficit of great concern to many organizations that provide health services.

Arkansas Medicaid Funding And Youth Home: Part One

May 22, 2012
Michelle Blaney
Malcolm Glover

As Arkansas officials prepare for a Medicaid shortfall of close to $400 million in 2014, many organizations that rely on those funds are battling budgetary constraints to continue providing necessary services that meet the needs of their patients.

On a rainy afternoon in a rural corner of West Little Rock, 20-year old Michelle Blaney from Bryant returns to the campus of Youth Home, the oldest and largest psychiatric treatment facility for adolescents in Arkansas.

Dr. Gary Wheeler
Malcolm Glover

  Next month, a Little Rock doctor will complete a yearlong project to help women in Belize get necessary medical care. Dr. Gary Wheeler with the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences has been working with the Belize Family Life Association and its network of clinics on an educational video that encourages Belizean women to get annual checkups to prevent cervical cancer.

UAMS

A state-of-the-art facility at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences will give nursing, pharmacy, and medical students’ hands-on training with computerized life-like manikins. The new Simulation Center also has trauma bays, hospital bedrooms, and special treatment rooms that can be converted into a public place, like a cafeteria, so students hone their skills. Michael Manley runs the center.

Tony Award winner Ben Vereen is in Little Rock using his vocal, dancing, and acting talents to raise money for a project and a cause that he deeply cares about.

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