Arkansas Science

Science Café — ‘The Science of Language’

Sep 25, 2018

Language comes in all different forms – verbal, written and physical. While all languages appear to have the common cornerstone of an object and then description of that object or what it is doing, languages can differ vastly from there.

Gretchen Cobb, language research and teacher at Arkansas School for the Deaf joined us in the studio to talk about the commonalities and differences in language, American Sign Language, the social context of language and how language is changing over time.

Science Cafe: Regulating The Growing Uses Of Drones

Jun 23, 2018
Drone
Don McCullough / Wikimedia Commons

The possible uses of unmanned aircraft vehicles, more commonly known as drones, are growing faster than regulations can keep up with. Uses include crop monitoring, disaster operations, photography, express shipping and more.

On KUAR's Science Café Little Rock, Charles Wilson, an FAA certified manned aircraft pilot with Aerial Digital Photography, discusses his experiences with drones.

Science Cafe: Police Forensic Science In Little Rock

May 25, 2018

Forensic science is wildly popular across many age ranges and career levels, thanks in part to very successful crime dramas on TV over the last couple of decades.

Meagan Buchert, Crime Scene Specialist with the Little Rock Police Department came into our studio to talk about what the real world of CSI. She discussed the process of working a crime scene, the evidence that is collected and what can be learned from that evidence.

Hendrix College / Hendrix College

TRANSCRIPT: KUAR’s David Monteith interviewed Dr. Courtney Hatch, assistant professor of Chemistry at Hendrix College, who received $550,000 from the National Science Foundation.

DAVID MONTEITH: You were awarded a $550,000 grant from the National Science Foundation. Congratulations.

DR. COURTNEY HATCH: Thank you.

Becker1999 / Wikimedia Commons

Advocates for using science and data to drive policy decisions plan to take their concerns to the steps of the Arkansas State Capitol Saturday.

The second annual March for Science happened in many states, including the nation’s Capitol, a week ago on April 14. Arkansas Sierra Club Executive Director Glenn Hooks says each march relates to the environmental issues in that state.

Tyson
Tyson Foods

Arkansas-based Tyson Foods Inc. has invested in a food-tech startup that's developing methods to produce meat directly from animal cells.

Springdale-based Tyson announced Monday that its venture capital arm, Tyson Ventures, now has a minority stake in Memphis Meats. The terms of the deal weren't disclosed, but Memphis Meats says it expects to use the funds to accelerate product development.

Tyson says the investment reflects the company's commitment to find new, innovative ways of meeting a growing global demand for protein.

J. Matthew Grant / University of Arkansas

The University of Arkansas’s Department of Physics in Fayetteville has announced progress that could lead to a great reduction in the size of electronics. Assistant Professor Dr. Hugh Churchill spoke with KUAR’s Michael Hibblen to explain this development.

Science Cafe: Hibernation In Arkansas Black Bears

Nov 29, 2017

On November's episode of Science Cafe-Little Rock, a look at hibernation. Myron Means, Large Carnivore Coordinator for the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission, joined host Dorothy Graves to talk about black bears in Arkansas and their unique form of hibernation. Means has worked with black bears for more than 21 years and shares his expertise.

David Monteith / KUAR

Even though Arkansas wasn’t in the path of totality for Monday's solar eclipse, people in the state came together at different locations and took joy watching as the moon covered much of the sun.

Phil Stein was among the hundreds who gathered at Riverfront Park in Little Rock at one of several watch parties organized by the Central Arkansas Library System.

solar eclipse 2017
NASA

Tales of viewing solar eclipses are passed down through the generations. In Arkansas they have made their way into family histories and narratives of identity, even for those who were too young to understand it. That has helped build the anticipation about Monday's rare eclipse.

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