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The USDA is buying milk and giving it to food banks

22 hours ago

For the first time ever, the U.S. Department of Agriculture will buy up milk from dairy farmers – $50 million worth. It'll go to soup kitchens and food banks to help people in need. But the program also has another purely economic purpose: to help America's struggling dairy producers. U.S. milk consumption has fallen more than 4 percent since last year, driven in part by shifting consumer preferences. Think of all those non-dairy milks, like almond and cashew, crowding store shelves. 

Seven years ago, Florida Gov. Rick Scott killed a federally funded project to build a high-speed train between Tampa and Orlando.

Scott now supports the idea of a similar train route — fueled by private investment instead. And the governor and his wife have invested millions of dollars with a company that stands to profit off such a project, as first reported by the Miami Herald.

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DAVID BIANCULLI, HOST:

Aretha Franklin is dead and we still, 50 years after she made her artistic and commercial breakthrough, can scarcely comprehend the still-shocking power of her singing.

In an effort to save money and perhaps to promote longer-term thinking, this morning President Trump tweeted today that he wants regulators to look at ending quarterly reports for public companies, which have been required by law since 1970. What about twice a year instead of four?

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The official death toll from flooding in the Indian state of Kerala spiked to at least 324 people on Friday, and the office of Kerala's chief minister, Pinarayi Vijayan, said "the rains continue to remain strong."

More than 223,000 people are now being housed in some 1,500 relief camps, Vijayan's office says. Nearly the entire state in southern India is under a red alert.

"Torrential rains have been battering Kerala for the past nine days, causing the worst floods to hit the coastal state in a century," Sushmita Pathak reports from Mumbai for NPR's Newscast unit.

Emojis Louise

Aug 17, 2018

In this final round, every answer is also an emoji, according to the Unicode Consortium. *sunglasses emoji*

Heard on Awkwafina And Sasha Velour: New York City Queens.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Sasha Velour is a winner. In June of 2017, the drag queen took home the crown on season nine of RuPaul's Drag Race. More than a year later, she's still using her queendom to spread the word about drag, and challenge perceptions about the art form.

On stage at the Bell House in Brooklyn, New York, Velour was dressed in yards of shiny silver fabric adorned with hundreds of huge, multicolored gems. She described the look to NPR's Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg as "a crown as a dress," or "what Queen Nosferatu wears to her daughter's lesbian summer wedding."

Banned Books on the Run

Aug 17, 2018

The lyrics of the Wings song "Band on the Run" are changed to be about books that were once banned, censored or challenged in the United States. It's trivia turned up to 451 degrees Fahrenheit.

Heard on Awkwafina And Sasha Velour: New York City Queens.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published on Nov. 1, 2016, and has been updated.

Crazy Rich Asians is, of course, not a movie about global development. But as it happens, the topic gets a cameo in the rom-com.

Main character Rachel Chu (played by Constance Wu) is a professor of economics. And on a trip to Singapore to meet the family of her "crazy rich" boyfriend Nick, she goes to a big wedding and runs into a Malay princess, who has written an article about ... microloans.

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