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110 trillion tons of ice projected to melt in Greenland — and it's too late prevent it

Melting icebergs near Illulissat, Greenland in 1991. (Courtesy of David Bahr)
Melting icebergs near Illulissat, Greenland in 1991. (Courtesy of David Bahr)

Human-driven climate change is expected to cause about 110 trillion tons of ice to melt off Greenland’s ice shield — and even the most drastic preventive measures can’t stop it, according to a study published in Nature Climate Change this week.

The result of the melt could be up to a foot of global sea level rise, which would have severe global consequences on both coastal and inland regions.

David Bahr is a glaciologist at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He joins Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd to talk about the study and the consequences of its findings.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.