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Little rock school district
KATV-Channel 7

The Little Rock teachers union says its members won't show up for in-person classes due to concerns about the spread of coronavirus in schools.

The Little Rock Education Association said Sunday its members are willing to teach classes virtually, but accused district administrators of not doing enough to prevent the virus's spread.

The superintendent of the state-controlled district said it was taking additional steps to ensure schools stay open for in-person instruction.

Lines of cars go through a triage center Monday at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock for people to be tested for the coronavirus. A spokeswoman says the average wait time has been three to four hours, with about 500 people tes
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The Arkansas Department of Health is reporting the number of coronavirus cases increased by 549 in the state while the number of deaths due to COVID-19, the illness caused by the disease, stayed the same.

On Sunday, the health department reported there were 73,690 confirmed cases of the virus, up from 73,141 cases reported on Saturday.

The number of deaths remained at 1,181, the figure reported on Saturday. The number of deaths includes both confirmed and probable cases.

UAMS covid-19 coronavirus
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas has reported 399 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 10 more deaths from the illness caused by the virus.

The Department of Health said at least 69,449 people have tests positive for the virus since the pandemic began. The department also said an additional 21 people tested positive through antigen testing since Sunday, bringing the total number of those cases to 1,178.

The deaths reported Monday brings the state's COVID-19 fatalities to 986. Five more people were hospitalized, bringing the total to 378.

Arkansas health officials say the state has 572 newly confirmed COVID-19 cases and nine additional deaths due the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The Arkansas Department of Health on Sunday said there are 49,383 confirmed cases in the state. The death toll stands at 544.

The department says 41,452 people have recovered from the virus and there were 7,387 active cases Sunday.

The true number of coronavirus cases in Arkansas is likely higher because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected and not feel sick.

Jason Rapert Ten 10 Commandments
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

An Arkansas state senator is in the hospital after testing positive for the coronavirus.

Sen. Jason Rapert on Thursday said in a statement provided by the Senate that he was hospitalized after being diagnosed with pneumonia and testing positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. The statement said Rapert was responding well to treatment.

Rapert is a 48-year-old Republican who has served in the Senate since 2011. Last year he announced he was seeking the GOP nomination for lieutenant governor in 2022.

Former U.S. Senator David Pryor (center) at a KUAR-hosted discussion on Oct. 4, 2017 at the main branch of the Central Arkansas Library System.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The family of David Pryor, a former Arkansas governor and U.S. senator, says he's hospitalized in Little Rock after testing positive for COVID-19.

The family's statement said David Pryor and his wife Barbara Pryor both received positive test results Friday. Barbara Pryor, who didn’t have symptoms, is quarantining at home but David Pryor, who is 85 and a stroke and heart attack survivor, was admitted Saturday to the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

Daniel Lewis Lee, seen here at an arraignment hearing on Oct. 31, 1997, was convicted in the deaths of an Arkansas family as part of a plot to set up a whites-only nation in the Pacific Northwest.
Russellville Courier

A U.S. district judge on Monday ordered a new delay in federal executions, hours before the first lethal injection was scheduled to be carried out at a federal prison in Indiana. The Trump administration immediately appealed to a higher court, asking that the executions move forward.

U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan said there are still legal issues to resolve and that "the public is not served by short-circuiting legitimate judicial process." The executions, pushed by the Trump administration, would be the first carried out at the federal level since 2003.

NBC's Andrea Mitchell questions Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson about the coronavirus pandemic Sunday on "Meet the Press."
NBC News

If President Donald Trump decides to hold a campaign rally in Arkansas, the state will insist that all participants are socially distanced and wear masks to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, Gov. Asa Hutchinson said Sunday.

Hutchison’s comments on NBC’s “Meet the Press” follow Trump rallies in Tulsa, Oklahoma, and at an Arizona megachurch, as well as an Independence Day celebration at Mount Rushmore, where most of the thousands of participants flouted public safety guidelines on maintaining a safe distance and wearing masks.

Governor's Office / YouTube

Officials say a state program that was created to process unemployment applications in Arkansas for self-employed individuals or gig economy workers appears to have been illegally accessed and has been shut down.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson said Saturday an applicant for the program is believed to have somehow accessed the system, prompting an investigation of a possible data breach. The probe will determine if any personal data from applicants was obtained.

Varner Arkansas Department of Correction Cummins Prison
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The Arkansas Department of Corrections says two more state prison inmates who were being treated for the coronavirus have died.

Department spokesman Solomon Graves says the cause of their deaths will be determined by medical officials, but that both inmates who died Sunday at the Cummins unit were being treated for COVID-19.

State health officials earlier confirmed the deaths of two other inmates at Cummins, where at least 860 prisoners have tested positive.

Union Pacific
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A company representative says Union Pacific Corp. is furloughing most of the staff at its facility in North Little Rock that repairs the railroad’s locomotives after seeing a substantial drop in business volume because of the coronavirus pandemic.

Kristen South is the Nebraska-based railroad's senior director for corporate communications and media relations. She declined to specify how many people were laid off but said employees on Thursday started receiving notifications regarding the Jenks Locomotive Facility’s temporary closure.

A group representing the only surgical abortion clinic in Arkansas says the state's move to resume elective surgeries could still effectively ban the procedure because of a lack of widespread coronavirus testing.

The American Civil Liberties Union of Arkansas on Friday did not say whether Little Rock Family Planning Services would be able to resume surgical abortions when the state eases its restrictions on elective procedures next week.

A group of medical professionals is asking death penalty states, including Arkansas, for medications used both for lethal injections and to help coronavirus patients who are on ventilators.

But a doctor who's behind the request and a death penalty expert say secrecy surrounding executions could hinder their efforts.

A federal judge has blocked Arkansas' order preventing the state's only surgical abortion clinic from performing the procedure during the coronavirus pandemic.

The judge's decision on Tuesday came as health officials said the number of coronavirus cases in the state has risen to nearly 1,500 people.

The number of deaths in Arkansas increased by two to 32.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson has said the decision on when to lift Arkansas' restrictions remains with the state, despite President Donald Trump asserting he has “total” authority.

Varner Arkansas Department of Correction Cummins Prison
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The first state prisoner in Arkansas has been diagnosed with the novel coronavirus.

Arkansas Department of Corrections spokeswoman Dina Tyler says the man tested positive for COVID-19 at a hospital Saturday. He was being held at the Cummins Unit in Grady, about 75 miles southeast of Little Rock.

Other prisoners and staff who were exposed to the man have been tested for the virus, and access to his housing unit has been restricted. Tyler says that as of Friday 13 corrections employees were quarantined after testing positive.

Arkansas Department of Health
KATV-Channel 7

Arkansas health officials say the number of coronavirus cases in the state has reached 1,000. The state Department of Health says the state has had 18 deaths.

Arkansas shut down its public schools, closed many businesses and banned gatherings of more than 10 people. But it has stopped short of issuing the stay-at-home orders that most other states have imposed.

Arkansas Senate President Pro Tem Jim Hendren (R-Gravette) and House Speaker Matthew Shepherd (R-El Dorado) speak on their legislative priorities during a press event Friday
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas lawmakers are preparing to meet again amid the coronavirus outbreak, but legislative leaders say they hope to wrap up work in less than two weeks.

Senate President Jim Hendren said Friday lawmakers will move forward as planned with the fiscal session set to begin on Wednesday.

The session is moving forward days after two House members tested positive for COVID-19.

The session will include similar social distancing restrictions to last week, when lawmakers approved a $173 million coronavirus fund. Health officials say Arkansas has had at least 687 cases.

A sign language interpreter, Gov. Asa Hutchinson and Arkansas Department of Health Secretary Nate Smith at Sunday's press briefing.
Governor's Office / YouTube

The number of coronavirus deaths in Arkansas has risen by one to six and the number of cases is at least 426, up from 404.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson and state Secretary of Health Dr. Nate Smith said Sunday that it is encouraging that the number of cases in the state is not rising as rapidly as in some parts of the country, such as New York City, but residents must continue doing things such as social distancing and limiting travel.

Hutchinson said the number of hospitalizations due to the virus dropped from 48 on Saturday to 43 on Sunday.

Hutchinson COVID-19 coronavirus
Governor's Office / YouTube

Arkansas has had its first deaths from the coronavirus outbreak.

Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Tuesday announced two people have died from COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus.

Damage from what officials say was likely a tornado in north-central Arkansas between the towns of Pyatt and Bruno.
KATV-Channel 7

Severe storms, including at least one possible tornado, have struck parts of Arkansas, damaging homes and causing widespread damage to trees and power lines.

Officials say at least one home was destroyed and another lost its roof to a storm that struck a remote Ozark Mountains area Thursday evening near Pyatt in northern Arkansas, near the Missouri border.

At least one person was sent to a hospital in nearby Harrison, Arkansas, with minor injuries.

Arkansas Department of Health Director Nathaniel Smith and Gov. Asa Hutchinson speak to reporters Wednesday about the first presumptive case of the coronavirus reported in the state.
Governor's Office / YouTube

The number of coronavirus cases in Arkansas has risen to 30 and includes the first person one in the northwest corner of the state. 

The Department of Health announced the eight new cases on its website Wednesday.

Arkansas State Capitol
Chris Hickey / KUAR News

A proposal has been filed in Arkansas that would create a new nine-member independent commission to redraw the state's congressional and legislative districts.

Arkansas Voters First on Thursday filed the proposed amendment to the state's constitution that the group hopes to get on the ballot this fall. The group must submit nearly 90,000 signatures from registered voters by July 3 to qualify the measure for the ballot.

Arkansas' legislative districts are redrawn by a panel comprised of the governor, attorney general and secretary of state.

Willie Mae Harris
Department of Correction

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson says he will commute the sentence of a woman convicted more than three decades ago of fatally shooting her husband, who had physically abused her.

Hutchinson on Wednesday announced his intent to make Willie Mae Harris immediately eligible for parole.

Harris was convicted in 1985 of first degree murder in the shooting death of her husband.

Harris admitted to shooting her husband, but has said it was an accident related to self defense.

Pulaski County Judge Wendell Griffen
PBS

An Arkansas judge has blocked the state from issuing more licenses to sell medical marijuana. That's after a Pine Bluff dispensary says it was unfairly overlooked for another applicant.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen on Tuesday granted a temporary restraining order as requested by Medicanna of Pine Bluff. Medicanna sued the state Medical Marijuana Commission after another dispensary was awarded a license to sell medical marijuana.

Griffen scheduled a March 3 hearing on whether to grant a preliminary injunction against the state.

Leslie Rutledge
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Arkansas's attorney general is accusing a Hot Springs woman of taking part in a multi-million dollar scheme to defraud people by falsely telling them they had won a jackpot or lottery.

On Wednesday, Attorney General Leslie Rutledge sued 74-year-old Jean Butler, who Rutledge said acted as a "money mule" and received money from victims of the scheme. Victims were told they had to pay taxes or fees before receiving their prize.

University of Arkansas

One of the country's most revered novelists has died.

Charles Portis, best known for "True Grit," was 86. His fans included Tom Wolfe, Roy Blount Jr. and Larry McMurtry, and he was often compared to Mark Twain for his plainspoken humor and wry perspective.

Portis saw the world from the ground up, from bars and shacks and trailer homes, and few spun wilder and funnier stories. In such Portis novels as "True Girt" and "Norwood," characters embarked on journeys that took the most unpredictable detours.

"True Grit" was twice made into a feature film.

Arkansas Works Governor Asa Hutchinson Work Requirement
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A federal appeals court panel in Washington has upheld a lower court's decision that blocked the Trump administration's work requirements for Medicaid recipients.

Friday's decision from a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington, D.C., found the Arkansas work requirements for Medicaid recipients to be “arbitrary and capricious.”

The Trump administration has allowed states to require able-bodied adults drawing Medicaid benefits to work, volunteer or study. Officials argue that work can make people healthier.

Ten Commandments Jason Rapert
Brian Chilson / Arkansas Times

A trial seeking the removal of a privately funded Ten Commandments monument from the Arkansas Capitol grounds is set to begin this summer. 

U.S. District Judge Kristine Baker on Monday ordered the trial over the privately funded monument to begin the week of July 13.

Opponents of the monument sued the state over the display, arguing it's an unconstitutional endorsement of religion by government.

The granite monument replaces a display that was destroyed in 2017 less than 24 hours after its installation.

Forrest City Walmart shooting
KATV-Channel 7

Two police officers were wounded and a gunman was killed Monday morning in an exchange of gunfire at a Walmart store in Forrest City in eastern Arkansas, authorities said.

Forrest City Police Chief Deon Lee said one of the officers was taken to a hospital about 45 miles to the east in Memphis where he was in surgery, and the initial prognosis is “he’s going to be OK.”

Patricia Young, sister of executed inmate Ledell Lee (left), speaks to reporters during a press conference on Jan. 24 announcing the legal challenge to seek DNA testing that she argued could exonerate her brother.
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

An Arkansas judge has approved an agreement that will allow new tests of fingerprint and DNA evidence that two groups say could exonerate a man executed in 2017.

Pulaski County Circuit Judge Wendell Griffen approved the agreement between the city of Jacksonville and the sister of Ledell Lee, who was executed for the 1993 slaying of Debra Reese.

The American Civil Liberties Union and the Innocence Project had sued the city seeking the release of the evidence.

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