All Things Considered

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In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features.

The first Americans quarantined after evacuation from Wuhan, China, the center of this winter's coronavirus outbreak, are now beginning to settle back into normal routines.

For 24-year-old Daniel Wethli, a history buff who majored in philosophy as an undergrad, leaving Wuhan last month at the urging of the U.S. State Department was bittersweet.

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Three years ago, NPR accompanied disease ecologist Kevin Olival on a field trip to Malaysian Borneo.

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Michael Bloomberg was in Utah today trying to turn the page after a rocky performance in the Democratic debate in Las Vegas last night. He got a warm reception at his rally, which he joked was a welcome change.

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The first group of individuals quarantined after evacuation from Wuhan, the center of the coronavirus outbreak, are beginning to settle back into normal routines. NPR's Patti Neighmond spoke with one young man who lives in a suburb of Pittsburgh.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: Twenty-four-year-old Daniel Wethli is a Fulbright scholar, a history buff who majored in philosophy, and was in Wuhan studying the 1911 Chinese revolution.

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The first group of individuals quarantined after evacuation from Wuhan, the center of the coronavirus outbreak, are beginning to settle back into normal routines. NPR's Patti Neighmond spoke with one young man who lives in a suburb of Pittsburgh.

PATTI NEIGHMOND, BYLINE: Twenty-four-year-old Daniel Wethli is a Fulbright scholar, a history buff who majored in philosophy, and was in Wuhan studying the 1911 Chinese revolution.

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Updated Feb. 21, 11:46 a.m. ET

Last month, a British man went to a conference in Singapore, then on a ski trip to the French Alps.

What he didn't know when he arrived in the Alps was that he was infected with the virus behind the COVID-19 outbreak.

During his stay at a ski village, it appears he infected 11 other people, who subsequently traveled on to the U.K. and Spain, the World Health Organization says.

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One of hip-hop's brightest young stars has died according to his record label. Bashar Jackson, who performed as Pop Smoke, was 20 years old. The details surrounding his death are still emerging. NPR Music's Sidney Madden joined me here in the studio to talk about Pop Smoke's music and legacy.

SIDNEY MADDEN, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

SHAPIRO: For those who don't know his music, who was Pop Smoke, and what space did he occupy in the hip-hop scene?

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There has been another shakeup tonight with President Trump's national security team. The president tweeted this evening that he's replacing his acting director of national intelligence with another official who will also serve in an acting capacity. The man who's been in the job since last August, Joseph Maguire, is out. And Richard Grenell, who's been the U.S. ambassador to Germany, is in. NPR's Greg Myre joins us with the latest on this breaking story.

Hi, Greg.

GREG MYRE, BYLINE: Hey, Ari.

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In 1981, Charles Fuller's A Soldier's Play premiered in New York City, featuring actors who would go on to become household names, like Samuel L. Jackson and Denzel Washington. The following year, Fuller became the second African American in history to win the Pulitzer Prize for Drama. But, at the time, the play did not transfer to Broadway. Fuller, who is now 80, wasn't surprised.

"I never thought it would be on Broadway," he says from his home in Toronto.

DJ and producer Andrew Weatherall, a titan of underground dance music, died Monday in London at age 56. The cause of death was a pulmonary embolism, according to a statement released by his management.

Weatherall started producing in London in the mid-'80s, and was known for a wicked sense of humor — and for blending an eclectic mix of genres.

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It's been warmer than normal in the Alps. There's less snowfall, even some rain. And all of that is making skiing at lower-altitude resorts difficult. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley sends this report from this French ski town of Morzine.

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John High has diabetes, which led to his leg being amputated below the knee two years ago. He's been using a wheelchair since then, and hasn't gotten used to having to work out solutions to everyday problems — such as getting in and out of the shower in the small rental house he shares with his son in Norman, Okla. But when he hears a tornado siren blaring out its high-pitched warning he feels a spasm of fear and dread. In this situation, he's on his own.

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Electronic dance music today is dominated by white European producers. Daft Punk, Tiesto and David Guetta are among the most successful acts in the game. But it was black American DJs who were among the first to pave the way in the '70s and '80s. DJs like Frankie Knuckles laid the groundwork for subgenres like house music and techno. A new wave of DJs, like Haitian-born Canadian producer Kaytranada, is keeping that spirit alive. Reviewer Miguel Perez says his new album "BUBBA" is a welcome nod to the roots of dance music. Here's his review from last month.

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Before Brandon Taylor became a writer, he was a biochemistry researcher, breeding microscopic worms in a lab.

BRANDON TAYLOR: I come from a very working-class background in rural Alabama. And so for me, going into science, even with my, you know, small graduate stipend, that was the most money anyone in my family had made.

CORNISH: But Taylor was also the only black queer man in his program doing a job that was already isolating by nature.

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Singer, writer and producer Natasha Khan moved to LA to write scripts and music for film after her 2016 release, The Bride. The release marked the end of her recording contract with EMI and she wasn't sure she'd write another album as Bat for Lashes.

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On Valentine's Day, Huey Lewis and The News released Weather — what might be the last album in a career that has spanned four decades. That's because the band's frontman and namesake can no longer hear his own music as it sounds.

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For years now, more and more people have been embracing their natural hair. They're choosing to let it curl rather than straightening it with heat and chemicals. And if you're part of the curly hair community, you know this natural hair movement runs deep.

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Valentine's Day is one of the busiest days of the year for those who work in restaurants. It's also a day that many in the industry love to hate.

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