Race Relations

Election vote
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

A federal lawsuit alleges the voting system for some Arkansas judges violates black residents' rights by diluting the strength of the vote.

Lawyers for the NAACP's Legal Defense and Education Fund filed the lawsuit Tuesday. It says that because the state's seven Supreme Court judges are elected statewide instead of by district, the white voting bloc overpowers the votes of black Arkansas residents.

David Monteith / KUAR News

A crowd of roughly 60 people gathered at the Arkansas state Capitol Monday to protest the exoneration of Little Rock police officer Charles Stark. He shot and killed Bradley Blackshire during a traffic stop earlier this year. The 30-year old black man was driving a stolen vehicle and footage released by the department showed Blackshire refused the officer's order to exit the car, which then slowly moved toward Stark. 

Relocation, Arkansas: Aftermath of Incarceration
www.relocationarkansas.com

A documentary film probes the impact that a World War II Japanese American internment camp had on a community in southeast Arkansas, and on later generations. "Relocation, Arkansas: Aftermath of Incarceration" is being shown Friday at 3 p.m. at the Ron Robinson Theater in Little Rock.

Elaine Race Massacre
Arkansas State Archives

King cotton’s prices were on the rise, but the black sharecroppers who picked it were not benefiting. It was Sept. 30, 1919, and the harvest was about to get underway.

About 100 sharecroppers met at a church in the town of Elaine, a small town in Phillips County that sits in the vast Mississippi Delta Region. Armed black guards protected the people inside. Suddenly, white men appeared outside.

Dr. Kenneth Jones and and Dr. Laverne Bell-Tolliver were two of the 25 students who desegregated Little Rock's junior high schools in phase two of the school district's desegregation plan. Bell-Tolliver edited the book The First Twenty-Five, An Oral Histo
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

The story of the 1957 desegregation of Little Rock’s Central High School by nine black students is well known. But overshadowed is phase two of the school district’s desegregation plan, which involved 25 students attending five previously all-white junior high schools in 1961 and 1962.

Former President Bill Clinton
Michael Hibblen / KUAR News

Former President Bill Clinton is to deliver the keynote address at a ceremony next month that will cap four days of events commemorating the 60th anniversary of the integration of Little Rock’s Central High School. The eight surviving members of the Little Rock Nine, who integrated the formerly all-white school in 1957, are also expected to take part.

Ted Bonner
KATV, Channel 7 News

The Blevins school board member who sparked protests by dressing in blackface for a party was given an award as the "Outstanding School Board Member"

KATV Channel 7 reports that Ted Bonner was recognized Monday night during the board's regularly scheduled meeting. Only 28 people were allowed inside, with officials citing orders by the Fire Marshal's office.

Outside of the room, several people opposed to Bonner stood listening to what was going on inside.

Ted Bonner
KATV, Channel 7 News

The Arkansas NAACP and several residents are calling for the resignation of a school board member in eastern Arkansas after photos surfaced of him in blackface while holding a sign referring to the Black Lives Matter movement.

NAACP members and others demanded Ted Bonner's resignation Monday during a Blevins School Board meeting. But the board's president, Justice West, says there's no mechanism for removing Bonner, who has refused to resign. Bonner has two years left in his term.

rohwer
astate.edu

A $2.8 million grant from the National Park Service will support projects planned at camps where Japanese-Americans were held during World War II.

The projects include the Rohwer and the Jerome relocation centers in southeastern Arkansas.

Gov.'s Radio Column: Black History

Feb 13, 2016
Governor Asa Hutchinson radio address
Office of the Governor

The following is a transcript of Gov. Asa Hutchinson's radio column for the weekend of Feb. 13, 2016:

February is a month for many things, but perhaps most importantly, it’s a month of remembrance. It’s a time to celebrate Black History and share the stories and legacies that contribute to our nation’s place in history.

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